LAB 7: Save the Pixels

1) ISO 400

Correctly exposed

Correctly exposed

Underexposed

Underexposed

Overexposed

Overexposed

The correctly exposed image is clearly the best one, because it keeps the white background white and doesn't overexpose his skin or hair, and also doesn't darken the image to the point where the flaws in the white backdrop can be seen.

2) ISO 1600

Correctly exposed

Correctly exposed

Correctly exposed (100%)

Correctly exposed (100%)

Underexposed (100%)

Underexposed (100%)

The noise is worse in the underexposed image.

3) RAW vs JPEG

Whole JPEG

Whole JPEG

RAW 100%

RAW 100%

JPEG 100%

JPEG 100%

The JPEG image is quite pixelated at 100%, whereas the RAW image is not.

LAB 6: Histograms

1) High-key

Most of the pixels can be found on the right side of my histogram. If I were to print this, there would be no clipping, because there are no pixels on the far right touching the side of the histogram.

Most of the pixels can be found on the right side of my histogram. If I were to print this, there would be no clipping, because there are no pixels on the far right touching the side of the histogram.

1) Low-key

Most of the pixels can be found on the left side of the histogram, although there are a few on the ride side due to the presence of the white object. If I printed this image, the blue tones in the black would not print properly, since the blue pixels are touching the side of the histogram and the triangle on the left side is blue.

Most of the pixels can be found on the left side of the histogram, although there are a few on the ride side due to the presence of the white object. If I printed this image, the blue tones in the black would not print properly, since the blue pixels are touching the side of the histogram and the triangle on the left side is blue.

3) Tones

The majority of the pixels fall on the left side, but there are many in the middle and the right of the image as well. They are much more distributed here than in the other two histograms. Since no pixels are touching the sides of the histogram, this could be printed just fine. This is clearly the histogram with the most dynamic range.

The majority of the pixels fall on the left side, but there are many in the middle and the right of the image as well. They are much more distributed here than in the other two histograms. Since no pixels are touching the sides of the histogram, this could be printed just fine. This is clearly the histogram with the most dynamic range.

I think my camera is overall, properly exposing the images because the mouse was always well-exposed in the images. 

 

LAB 4: Creative White Balance

1)

AWB

AWB

Cloudy WB

Cloudy WB

Custom WB

Custom WB

2)

AWB The colours are relatively neutral in this photo.

AWB

The colours are relatively neutral in this photo.

Shade WB The image is way too yellow here.

Shade WB

The image is way too yellow here.

Florescent WB This photo isn't as bad as the one shot with Shade WB, but the colours are still too cool.

Florescent WB

This photo isn't as bad as the one shot with Shade WB, but the colours are still too cool.

3)

Cloudy WB The orange white balance makes the image look quite fake, but it does give it a vintage and artsy look. I personally don't like the white balance, but it definitely looks edgier than just a plain old plant photo.

Cloudy WB

The orange white balance makes the image look quite fake, but it does give it a vintage and artsy look. I personally don't like the white balance, but it definitely looks edgier than just a plain old plant photo.

ASSIGNMENT 1: Creative use of Shutter and Aperture

1- Shoot a sport

I really didn't know what to do for sports so I decided to head over to my dad's gym and take photos people working out. I like this shot because the action is really focused, but if I were to shoot it again I would have used a smaller aperture so that the ball would be slightly more in focus.

I really didn't know what to do for sports so I decided to head over to my dad's gym and take photos people working out. I like this shot because the action is really focused, but if I were to shoot it again I would have used a smaller aperture so that the ball would be slightly more in focus.

2- Pan a moving object

I think this photo looks pretty cool, and I think it is an effective use of panning. I did however have a lot of difficulty with this, and it took me many, MANY tries to be able to get just one successful photo.

I think this photo looks pretty cool, and I think it is an effective use of panning. I did however have a lot of difficulty with this, and it took me many, MANY tries to be able to get just one successful photo.

3- Shoot a night scene

I opened and closed my hand in front of the camera in order to give a ghosting effect. My initial idea was to get a car passing on my street, but I live in a very boring residential area, so that didn't happen because no cars passed while I was outside. 

I opened and closed my hand in front of the camera in order to give a ghosting effect. My initial idea was to get a car passing on my street, but I live in a very boring residential area, so that didn't happen because no cars passed while I was outside. 

4- Shoot a portrait with shallow DOF

I really like this portrait because it has a moody and eclectic look. I like the subtleness of the bokeh because it adds a dreamy effect to the already surrealist-looking image.

I really like this portrait because it has a moody and eclectic look. I like the subtleness of the bokeh because it adds a dreamy effect to the already surrealist-looking image.

5- Shoot a landscape with a deep DOF

I took this image at La Malbaie this past weekend. I really like this image, it definitely makes the river look large and beautiful. I would have liked to get some of the shoreline as well, however it was barely visible from the lookout point I was at.

I took this image at La Malbaie this past weekend. I really like this image, it definitely makes the river look large and beautiful. I would have liked to get some of the shoreline as well, however it was barely visible from the lookout point I was at.

LAB 3: Lenses

I used 3 lenses for this lab: a Canon 85mm f/1.8, a Canon 50mm f/1.8 and a Canon 35mm f/2.0. I shot with my Canon 80D and used a tripod as well.

1- Still Life

35mm - There's quite a bit of background in this photo, and although it is blurred, it is identifiable almost instantly as a computer screen and keyboard. The lines, especially the keyboard towards the far left of the photo, are slightly distorted, seeming more curved then they really are.

35mm - There's quite a bit of background in this photo, and although it is blurred, it is identifiable almost instantly as a computer screen and keyboard. The lines, especially the keyboard towards the far left of the photo, are slightly distorted, seeming more curved then they really are.

50mm - The background is cut in this photo, showing less of the keyboard and of the computer screen, and the bokeh is also more intense, making it less clear what exactly the background object is.

50mm - The background is cut in this photo, showing less of the keyboard and of the computer screen, and the bokeh is also more intense, making it less clear what exactly the background object is.

85mm - The background is quite tight in this photo, the computer screen is completely cut and the keyboard is heavily blurred. The lines, however, are very straight, with no visible lens distortion.

85mm - The background is quite tight in this photo, the computer screen is completely cut and the keyboard is heavily blurred. The lines, however, are very straight, with no visible lens distortion.

2- People

85mm - Luc's face is pretty flat in this photo, and it really just seems like there are two layers: the foreground and background, with no clear transition between them. I do find that this is the nicest portrait of the 3 however, because of the quality of the background blur.

85mm - Luc's face is pretty flat in this photo, and it really just seems like there are two layers: the foreground and background, with no clear transition between them. I do find that this is the nicest portrait of the 3 however, because of the quality of the background blur.

50mm - Luc's face seems slightly rounder and has more dimension in this photo, and Emily is identifiable compared to the 85mm where she was completely blurred out. The background is blurred, but less than with the 85mm.

50mm - Luc's face seems slightly rounder and has more dimension in this photo, and Emily is identifiable compared to the 85mm where she was completely blurred out. The background is blurred, but less than with the 85mm.

35mm - There is more distortion in this photo, with the bottom of Luc seeming larger than usual and his head looking small. Emily, although slightly blurred, is much more visible than in the first 2 images, and the background is also much clearer.

35mm - There is more distortion in this photo, with the bottom of Luc seeming larger than usual and his head looking small. Emily, although slightly blurred, is much more visible than in the first 2 images, and the background is also much clearer.

FOCAL LENGTH / DOF

85mm - The background is very blurred in this image, as well as an element in front of a subject. Only the subject is sharp.

85mm - The background is very blurred in this image, as well as an element in front of a subject. Only the subject is sharp.

50mm - The background is still blurred, but it is more visible: we can clearly identify the computers and the chairs. There is also more in the frame, since 50mm is a wider focal length than 85mm. 

50mm - The background is still blurred, but it is more visible: we can clearly identify the computers and the chairs. There is also more in the frame, since 50mm is a wider focal length than 85mm. 

35mm - The background here is barely blurred, and is easily identifiable. The objects in front of the subject are also blurred, but still identifiable. There is a lot more in frame here, since it was shot with a wide focal length, and the subject doesn't take up a lot of space in the photo.

35mm - The background here is barely blurred, and is easily identifiable. The objects in front of the subject are also blurred, but still identifiable. There is a lot more in frame here, since it was shot with a wide focal length, and the subject doesn't take up a lot of space in the photo.

LENS TEST

2.jpg
In these 3 images, shot respectively at 35mm, 50mm and 85mm, all at f/2.0, have reasonably sharp centres but start to lose sharpness around the corners.

In these 3 images, shot respectively at 35mm, 50mm and 85mm, all at f/2.0, have reasonably sharp centres but start to lose sharpness around the corners.

These 3 images, shot at 35mm, 50mm and 85mm respectively, at f/22, are all slightly soft throughout the whole of the images. 

These 3 images, shot at 35mm, 50mm and 85mm respectively, at f/22, are all slightly soft throughout the whole of the images. 

These two images, shot at 50mm and 35mm at f/11, are very sharp. Using an aperture in the middle of the lens' range produces sharper images.

These two images, shot at 50mm and 35mm at f/11, are very sharp. Using an aperture in the middle of the lens' range produces sharper images.